• Personally, one of the best rides in Colorado exists just to the south of Winter Park, CO. Most riders, me included at times, are head down and full steam to get over Berthoud Pass to get that day started at Trestle Bike Park. Don't get me wrong, Trestle Bike Park is amazing! But sometimes, the sense of adventure outweighs the lift lines, berms, jumps, and park features. Not many are aware that just off of Hwy 40 to the west while en route to Winter Park sits Jones Pass. This route was new to me until about 4 years ago. Now, I try to make room in my schedule to hit this out-n-back ride at least once a year. I didn't need to be in Winter Park until 4 PM to set up the Ergon Bike booth in the expo, so I pinged Kyle Taylor from 92Fifty Cyclery, who had the day off, to meet me at the trail head to get in a few hours on this route.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    The route starts with a 45-60 minute jeep road climb right from the parking lot. Steep in spots, but manageable with the Pivot and Canyon bikes we were on. The time spent pedaling this road, puts you right on the divide, just over 12,000 ft. Winter in Colorado was long and rough in 2013/14. Signs on the hard winter are still towering in the high mountains of Colorado. The cornice still exists and blocks the jeep road access to the top of the pass, in most cases 20 feet or higher. Bikes soon became crampons and ice axes as we scaled up the wall of snow.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    After making our way up and over the cornice without any carnage, we were well on our way southward on the CDT. Well defined, this trail snakes along towards I-70. For the most part, this trail in 90% rideable with a few steep punches and scree to get over.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    No matter how many times or how high in elevation I ride in Colorado, I am visually blown away by the massiveness of the Rocky Mountains. Kyle, pedals across one of the many saddles in the route....not sure if he is key'd in on the trail in front of him or if he is looking at what I am seeing through the camera to his left.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    Weather is always a factor when riding this high in elevation. We had eyes and ears to the sky all morning. Dark clouds began their early afternoon dance as we rode on.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    Traversing around 12,500 ft, we were just a few moments from turning around as our personal weather consciences began to send up red flags.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    Speechless.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    With a sense of urgency, Kyle makes his way back to Jones Pass to begin the 10 minute jeep road descent back to the cars.

    Jones Pass - 2014
    We timed it just right. We had to make our way back down the 20 foot high cornice as the black clouds built up and moved easterly. With the sun still shining, we scaled down the cornice and dropped back down to the cars. 45 minutes later, the skies would open up with rain and hail.

    No doubt, this is a great way to open up the 4 day weekend at the Colorado Freeride Festival and Enduro World Series!
  • July 18, 2014 
    Telluride, Colorado  

    Telluride, CO is known Worldwide for it's fantastic skiing in the winter. Soon it will be well known for it's Telluride 100 mountain bike race.  2014 marked the inaugural year for the Telluride 100 which covers 96 miles and climbs 15,000 ft.  As a first year event, the field was limited to 100 athletes.  Coming from all over the USA to tackle this demanding course, the athletes would ride 2 different loops, both starting and finishing in the town of Telluride.

    Loop 1 was the toughest loop of the day and also the shortest at about 33 miles.  Starting from town at 6 AM, the racer would climb up the numerous switchbacks of Black Bear Pass to over 13,000 ft before descending down the backside to then climb up to nearly 13,000 ft again going up and over Ophir Pass.  From the start, Yuki Ikeda of Topeak-Ergon, would take to the front with a small group of riders in tow, including teammate Jeff Kerkove. 

    DSCN0073

    Yuki would get a gap of 3 minutes on the opening climb up Black Bear Pass.  Jeff, who was pacing off the back of the 7 person lead group would work his way up to 2nd place by the top of the pass, followed closely by Travis Brown and Richie Trent.

    Yuki would maintain his lead through Loop 1 into Loop 2.  Jeff, riding in 2nd, would take a wrong turn due to a course marking issue and have to backtrack a few minutes.  This would result in Jeff and 3 other riders coming back together for the beginning of Loop 2.  Leading the charge on Loop 2, Yuki would ride solo off the front.

    EPIC0002

    The start of the 65 mile Loop 2 would prove to be the separation point for the chase group.  The steep climbing from the town of Telluride to mid-mountain on Telluride Ski resort would let eventual 2nd place finisher Stig Somme get away on a solo mission to try to catch Yuki.  Jeff and Ricky Willis would ride together until late in Loop 2.  Not far behind was Travis Brown of Trek.  The final 65 miles would take the riders over 2 more high mountain passes as well as add 4-5 hours of racing time.  In the end, Yuki Ikeda would stay solo off the front to win the inaugural Telluride 100.  Jeff Kerkove, who was battling for 3rd would drop to 5th by the finish line after working through a nutritional miscalculation in the last 20 miles.

    Yuki Ikeda following his victory, "My legs felt very good from the beginning, but I had some stomach issue towards the end. Sport drink and food didn't sit well in my stomach. I could only take was plain water. However my legs still worked and Stig Somme who finished second kept pushing me. I was super happy, honored and proud to take the win for the first year, and it was my first 100-miler win! However, it was not only about racing, I enjoyed the whole experience that Telluride offers!"

    Jeff Kerkove, coming in 5th, had this to say after finishing, "I am destroyed! The course was brutal but also visually jaw dropping. I rode a smart pace, but made a crucial mistake in nutrition planning late in the race and ran out of liquids. Now that I know the course and the timing of the aid stations, I'm looking to come back to better the result.  This event has everything to make it an iconic Colorado 100-mile race." 

    10499627_10152591331316151_4735633372551389377_o
    Podium (L to R): Travis Brown, Ricky Willis, Yuki Ikeda, Stig Somme, Jeff Kerkove 

    RESULTS
    Yuki Ikeda, Pro Men, 1st
    Jeff Kerkove, Pro Men, 5th

    Strava file: http://www.strava.com/activities/168148413
  • A re-post of a post I wrote up for PinkBike and MTBR.com.....

    Mosquito Range traverse

    With one of our Ergon Bike USA offices located in the heart of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado I am lucky to drive through some mind-blowing terrain. I often pass through Leadville en route to events, to visit Ergon retailers, and weekend rides. The Mosquito Range sits to the east of Leadville. It's peaks are high (topping out over 14,000 ft), but less aggressive than it's brother range to the west, the Sawatch Range. From a distance they look smooth and relatively flat in comparison to some of the jagged and aggressive peaks in any other direction. For the past few months, I have been eyeballing this range that shoots across the sky from south to north as I would pass through Leadville. I was curious, if it could be ridden. I knew it was accessible, but just how accessible would it be with a bike in hand?

    Over the past few months I looked at maps and did some web research. Folks had hiked the range, but nothing on anyone taking a bike across the ridge line. After putting a route on digital paper, I pinged the guys a 92Fifty Cyclery, a small shop near Black Hawk, CO. As personal friends, an Ergon retailer, and knowing they are all up for any bike adventure, I asked them if they would like to try to traverse the Mosquito Range by bike with me. I was straight up with them. I told them I had no idea how much of the route was be riding vs hike-a-bike. At 35 miles round trip with about 6,000 feet of vert, I planned on a 5-7 hour day taking into consideration we likely would be pushing and/or carrying our bikes.

    From 92Fifty was Jon, Kyle, and Richie. The four of us set out from downtown Leadville at 10 AM on a Sunday. We had 18 miles of pavement and jeep road to cover before we could even begin to gain the ridge line. We pedaled for 2 hours before we reached the top of Weston Pass to the southeast of Leadville. From here, the hardest part of the day towered over us. We had a hike-a-bike that was 1 mile long, gained 1400+ ft, and was an average gradient of 30%. On top of that, there was no trail.

    Mosquito Range Traverse
    JD pushes up from Weston Pass, which sits at an elevation of 11,900 ft.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Kyle and Richie led the charge through the high-alpine flora being chased by a very thick crop of mosquitoes.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    With no trail, we all alternated from making our own switchbacks and pushing the bike to putting the bike on our backs and hiking straight up. There was a sense of urgency. We wanted to know what exactly was at the top and what our proposed route really looked like.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    At an elevation of 13,300 ft, we reached the ridge line and stared onto the beauty of mother nature. There wasn't much talking. Just silence and the occasional sound of a picture being taken. The wind, not existent. I couldn't think of a better adventure to break in a brand new Canyon Spectral AL 29, received just a few days prior.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    We began the northward push on terrain that was very bike friendly. So far, so good. The route demanded the pedal friendly larger travel bikes. Most of us were on 140-150mm travel 27.5 and 29ers.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Not long and we found ourselves in pretty typical Colorado high mountain terrain; a blown out boulder field. Each step careful, as the rocks would slide and move. Each rider careful as to not roll and ankle or slice open some skin on the sharp rocks. Bikes became hiking poles on wheels.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    We made plenty of stops during the day on the ridge, mostly for sightseeing. Early in the ride we had to stop so JD could attend to some heel carnage sustained from the Weston Pass hike-a-bike. Both heels had pretty good size blisters on them. The fix was quick, but as we all know, blister hurt like hell until you can get out of your shoes.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    We truly are very small in this World.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    A quick break in the saddle just below Horseshoe Mountain.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Kyle makes his way to the summit of Horseshoe Mountain at our high point of the day, 13,800 ft. A cabin still stands telling the story of the mining times long ago.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    The top of Horseshoe Mountain is unlike any other terrain on the Mosquito Range. It's flat and smooth....and littered with the occasional mining hole.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    The flat smooth conditions didn't last long. Moments later we were back on the terrain that was expected....loose moving scree. JD had no problem pushing his Nukeproof down the "trail"


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Room for error? Not much. Ride or walk, it didn't matter. It came down to making smart riding decisions.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Signs of the long hard winter still exist below the summit of Mt Sheridan. Kyle watches his step as to not loose bike or footing.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    The saddle between Mt. Sheridan and Mt. Sherman would be our exit point. Mt Sherman is a popular 14er hike. The trail here is very well established, but it's very dry and loose. The camera doesn't do the steepness justice as JD drops towards Leadville.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    Kyle comes into one of the many switchbacks on the Mt. Sherman trail.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    The lower sections of the Mt Sherman trail are the burliest of the route. JD made most of this descent. The rest of us, had a hard time keeping the bike moving forward and upright.


    Mosquito Range Traverse
    7 hours after we left, we were back in Leadville. Pizza and beer was in order and the infamous High Mountain Pies!

    After seeing the path less traveled east of Leadville, I think we'll being doing a little bit more. If the sense of adventure is there, the path will always be there waiting to be traveled.

    Riders
    Jeff Kerkove
    Jonathan Davis
    Richie Trent, aka MTB Jesus
    Kyle Taylor
  • Enjoy!! Cut-n-paste from the team post-race press release.......

    July 8, 2014
    Durango and Breckenridge, Colorado, USA

    Over the past two weekends, Topeak-Ergon USA rider Jeff Kerkove, has been putting in some lengthy efforts on the Canyon race bikes. The last weekend of June, Jeff competed in the Durango Dirty Century (DDC), a 100-mile self-supported and self-navigated backcountry mountain bike race. The following weekend he celebrated the USA Independence day by toeing the start line of the fastest mountain bike marathon race in the USA, the Firecracker 50. While looking for solid results, both events would serve as preparation for the new Colorado event in 2 weeks, the Telluride 100 which he and teammate Yuki Ikeda with both compete in.

    Roughly 70 riders lined up to complete the Durango Dirty Centruy in late June. As a self-supported and self-navigated event, all riders had to carry most supplies to finish the 100-miles....which could take 10-15 hours to complete. Perfect weather hovered over the riders all day, which was welcomed as a majority of the course traverses above 10,000 feet and treeline.

    Jeff Kerkove had a great start to his DDC. He hit the singletrack in 4th place as riders began to settle into their efforts for the day. "I felt great and was keeping the effort light. I knew I would be in the saddle for over 10+ hours and the course would only get tougher" said Jeff. With the course consisting of 95% pure singletrack, riders would need every ounce of energy they had.

    2014 Durango Dirty Century

    At about the 50-mile mark Jeff started to slow. "It was a lack of fueling on my part. I had all the proper nutrition, but I simply got so caught up in the course and riding I fell behind on taking on calories," stated Jeff. Still moving forward, Jeff would be caught by chasing riders dropping back to around 10th place. Hoping to finish around 11 hours, Jeff rolled to the finish line in Durango after 12.5 hours on the bike.

    "It was slow going, but I had no option but to keep pushing on. The amazing course and beauty of the high terrain makes for enjoyable suffering," said a smirking Jeff at the finish line.

    Below is a video from about mile 70-80 of the DDC, filmed by Jeff with his Epic Camera....



    The following weekend was the Firecracker 50, an iconic 50-mile mountain bike marathon event held in Breckenridge, CO. Finishing off a 2-week hard training and racing block, Jeff lined up with 55 other Pro Men to complete two 25-mile laps around Breckenridge, CO.

    Out of the gate, Jeff hung to back of the lead group on Lap 1 of 2. The group charged up Boreas Pass Rd towards the opening singletrack. "I had no pacing limits today. It was ride hard from start to finish," said Jeff. Looping around Breckenridge at an average elevation of 10,500 ft. Jeff would turn his fast lap ever on the Firecracker course. After Lap 1 he was 6 minutes down to the leader of the event.

    2014 Firecracker 50

    Loop 2 was a different story. Still riding at a good pace, Jeff did slow from his Lap 1 effort. "The gas ran out! I had a hard time getting up the steep climbs." Jeff would drop his position on the race, but still finish strong. "The last 2 weeks caught up with me. I knew I would fade, but just didn't know when. Overall I am happy, as I was only 5 minutes slower than my previous fastest race time here in Breckenridge. Super fast Pro field today!" said a dust covered Jeff.

    Jeff will now settle into a 2 week rest block in preparation for the Telluride 100, a new 100-mile event to hit Colorado.

    RESULTS
    Jeff Kerkove, Durango Dirty Century, 8th place
    Jeff Kerkove, Firecracker 50, 25th place
  • Congrats to Wiens for winning the 50-miler! My race was good....and bad all in the matter of 100-miles.

    Cut-n-paste from the team release....

    This year marked the 5th year for the Bailey Hundo, a non-profit event that uses the race entry fees to support Trips for Kids, the Colorado League of high school MTB racing, and COMBA. Add in the professional organization and the enthusiastic Bailey community and you have a top-shelf event that utilizes some of the most amazing singletrack in the state of Colorado.

    In previous years, the Bailey Hundo was a stand alone 100-mile event. New for 2014, the Bailey Hundito was added, a 50-mile event. Lining up at 6 AM on a Saturday morning in downtown Bailey, CO would be nearly 500 racers, all looking to complete either the 50 or 100 mile events. Dave Wiens would represent the team in the 50-mile race, while Jeff Kerkove would saddle up for the 100-mile race.

    2014 Bailey Hundo and Hundito

    The race start was launched with the blast of a shotgun. Both the 50 and 100 mile racers started together, so Jeff and Dave were able to ride close to the front together as the field made its way south of town in search of the Colorado Trail. At the first climb, the field quickly separated. “I tried to hang with the top guys who, by the way were riding 55 miles more than me, but I got gapped off pretty fast. They were pinning it, said Dave in regards to the start. Jeff wasn’t far behind. “I could see Dave in front of me, but I had to keep a lid on my effort. So I never caught up to him. I was in for a 6-7 hour day,” commented Jeff.

    2014 Bailey Hundo and Hundito

    Dave continued to ride his pace in the 50-mile race. Really never sure of his placing in the race, Dave pushed his freshly built Canyon Lux CF to it’s limit on loose and dry Colorado Trail. “I was never sure exactly who might be ahead or behind me so I kept on the gas the entire distance,” said Dave after finishing. After racing hard for 50-mile and not really knowing his placing, Dave would cross the finish line in 1st place, becoming the first winner of the inaugural Bailey Hundito.

    2014 Bailey Hundo and Hundito

    Meanwhile, in the 100-mile race, Jeff was doing what he does best….start slow and finish fast. At the 60-mile checkpoint, Jeff was sitting in 7th overall with only a 2 minute gap to 5th and 6th. “I settled into a good late race pace. It didn’t take long and I moved into 5th with 20 miles to go, I could see 4th place up the road….I was very motivated,” said Jeff. Cruising the last 15 miles of the race, Jeff increased his effort, only to strain a muscle in the upper-hamstring of is left leg. “I’m not sure what happened, it has never happened before. It was a huge bummer, as I could barely pedal with my left leg.” Jeff slowed dramatically and went from hunting for that podium position to now just finishing. After finishing Jeff said, “That is the ups and downs of racing. I just need to make sure this isn’t a major injury, rest, then get back on the bike for the next events of the season.” Jeff would cross the line in 9th place in the Pro Men’s field.

    2014 Bailey Hundo and Hundito

    Next up, Dave will head to New York for the Leadville Qualifier Series event. Jeff heads to Durango, CO for the Durango Dirty 100

    Photos by Primal Wear, Inc. and Linda Guerrette Photography

    RESULTS
    Dave Wiens, 1st, Pro Men, Hundito (50-mile race)
    Jeff Kerkove, 9th, Pro Men, Hundo (100-mile race)

  • Yes, XC racing still hard as hell.  Still blows my mind how deep the talent pool is in this sport! Always a painful reminder that we all have to keep pushing and working hard.

    Here is the team PR piece.....

    Jeff Kerkove tunes his engine with one of the most competitive XC races in the USA, the Mountain Games in Vail, CO.

    The XC race every June at the GoPro Mountain Games in Vail, CO brings out the best XC racers in the USA; Olympians, National Champions, and World Cup winners. Without question, the event could double as the USA National XC Championships, as the $8,000 prize list has racer foaming at the mouth to hit the podium.

    2014 GoPro Mountain Games XC | Vail, CO

    Starting at 8,100 ft, the course covers 4.5 miles and climbs 1,100 ft up the side of Vail Ski Resort. The racers would complete 3 laps on this difficult course at altitude.

    In the middle of a big 2 week training block, Jeff Kerkove who lives near Vail mountain made the 30-mile commute by bike to toe the start line and push his limits of personal effort and anaerobic speed.

    Over 60 Pro Men lined up to race the 3-laps of the GoPro Mountain Games XC course. Out of the gate, a crash mid-pack split the field. Jeff was caught behind the crash, and forced to chase right from the start. "I didn't hit the deck like the 5 other guys did, but like most of the field I had to wait for them to move out of the way," stated a dust covered Jeff after finishing. With the crash, 1/2 the field got a head start on the later half of the field. Jeff was able to get into a small group of riders and started to chase the very fast front of the field. "We knew we would never see the front of the field, so we just pinned it as hard as we could possibly go to get what we came here for....suffering!"

    2014 GoPro Mountain Games XC | Vail, CO

    Jeff pulled off 3 consistent laps to move further up the field and finish in 35th place. Jeff after finishing, "I can't complain. I felt strong and my equipment worked great! Plus, the race was so much fun as there was no shortage of competition around me. Everyone gets pushed to their limit here."

    Photos © Linda Guerrette